Category Archives: periodontic disease

Gum Health: An Early Warning System

The relationship between your bones, gums, and teeth is collaboration at its best. When all three work in harmony, life is good. Any challenge can be confronted and mastered, if you have your health. But when this harmony is disturbed, the structure of your lifestyle is undermined.
As you age, your gums and teeth will reflect both what happens to you, and how you react. Those who understand oral health will start with understanding the gums. Because without strong gums, healthy teeth will be the victims of instability.
Patients often wonder why we poke around so much. We take intricate measurements of your gums to evaluate. We hear often that we are more thorough than our patients have ever experienced! The threats to gum health are displayed by the most minute changes. The numbers that we call out during our routine evaluations sound mysterious, but are the early-warning signals that save potential pain, time, and expense. We wish to show you how to keep your teeth and gums at their best.
Periodontitis is a gum disease that affects the periodontium, or the tissues that surround your teeth. The bone and tissue should fit tightly. But if there is loss, or a diminishing of this bone and tissue, dangerous pockets can form that are difficult to clean. They allow bacteria to grow and increase the chance for infection. A pocket reduction will solve the immediate threat, and prevent any further deterioration.
The threat begins with the microorganisms and bacteria that grow on the surface of the tooth. The body fights against these organisms by the tissue receding, and next, the bone. Periodontitis is diagnosed by examining the gum tissue with a probe and by evaluating x-rays to see bone loss. Gingival sulcus is the space between a tooth and the surrounding tissue. In gum disease, this pocket is deepened. Sadly, this condition causes the greatest loss of teeth for adults.
Age and wear increases these pockets. So to best slow deterioration, to keep gums and bone as a great foundation for the teeth so cared for, visit us regularly:
1. Track the fit of your gums, and detect gingivitis before it turns into periodontitis. During a periodontal exam, we examine the depth of space between your tooth and gum, examine the color and texture of your gums, and also see how much plaque build-up is present.
2. Receive Periodontal charting during check-ups, which is the process of organizing your teeth and gum health. Ideal pocket depth is less than 4 mm, which means no risk for periodontal disease.
3. Know what is normal for you. Each person has a different skin tone and condition for health. Observe your own mouth to know quickly any variations.
4. Brush correctly. Some patients damage their gums by continually pushing upon them so they recede by wear. Let us show you the best techniques to keep the teeth clean without any repetitive threats that happen with the best intensions!
5. Floss regularly to keep the space between your teeth clean, and to exercise your gum tissue. Like a muscle, the right exercise strengthens, whereas the wrong, or careless activity, will weaken. A few simple maintenance techniques will make all the difference!
6. Obtain treatment early for any issues that do arise. Gums are like an early-warning system for problems that only escalate in seriousness, and do not go away. Though the body is an amazing healer, when it comes to gums, help is needed, especially the longer you live.

 

Everyone has gum concerns, especially as the years pass. If you are young, the habits that you form now will pay off greatly for an enjoyable future! If you are older, consider the condition of your gums as indicative of your journey. Taking care of this very special collaboration continues to be your health guide like a map to where you most wish to go.

Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/

Dental Explanations You Can Understand

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.
To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.
Teeth as Best Friends
Until something happens, most of us take our teeth for granted. We may not always remember to brush and floss. We often procrastinate visits to the dentist. Teeth can be easy to ignore because problems don’t develop quickly. Rarely are there true emergencies. Like a best friend, they are always there to help our well being. Like a best friend, we depend on them when we need them. But, also like a best friend, they do need attention. They have needs as well. …
 
Cleaning Towards Total Health
Getting your teeth cleaned affects your health in unexpected ways. Though most people find it a mundane routine, research proves that your dental diligence is a measure of your total health. …
The Boost and Advantage of a Whiter Smile
Nothing impresses more than a dazzling smile. Many choose to whiten teeth for special occasions like weddings or job seeking. Others have jobs dealing with the public where first impressions are critical. White teeth says conscientious, healthy, prosperous—qualities people want around them—qualities we wish not only to project, but to live. …
Gum Health: An Early Warning System
The relationship between your bones, gums, and teeth is collaboration at its best. When all three work in harmony, life is good. But when this harmony is disturbed, the structure of your lifestyle is undermined. Gums are like an early-warning system for problems that only escalate in seriousness, and do not go away. Though the body is an amazing healer, when it comes to gums, help is needed. …
The Hidden Risks of Sleep Apnea 
You might be surprised to learn SA affects more than just your sleep. If you have SA, or believe you might, get informed and get treated. Not just because you’ll experience better insurance rates, but you’ll likely live longer, too. …

The Deception of Dental Insurance

About once a day, a patient declares: “I can’t get my teeth fixed because I don’t have dental insurance.” Many patients do not understand how dental insurance works. It is not fair to blame the patients for being confused about what benefits are offered. The general information that the insurance companies provide is vague and there is much it does not explain. Though it would be impossible to convey every coverage detail here, so-called dental insurance is not what most expect.

In the mid-70’s, when dental insurance was just coming onto the scene, the benefits were about $1000-$1500. Of course, the premiums that were paid to insurance companies have steadily increased over the last 35 years. Additionally, today $1000 does not buy nearly the same amount of dentistry that it bought in 1975. Back then, a crown fee was $222. Now it is about $1200. The coverage has not kept pace.

The purpose of any insurance is to protect you from catastrophic loss. You buy home insurance in case your house burns down. You buy medical insurance in case you have to be hospitalized. Do you need insurance to pay a $1500 dental bill? The insurance generally only covers 50-80%. This so-called insurance is of more benefit to the insurance company than it is to you!

Most seriously, this kind of insurance distorts your perception of dentist’s recommendation. It complicates your treatment plan because there is now a third party advising you on what dental care you can receive. 

Consider a common situation: a patient needs to be re-evaluated for periodontal disease in three months, but the insurance company will only pay if seen in six months. The adjusters have pre-set rules for every condition, regardless of personal situation. But no two patients have the same conditions! Nonetheless, those unfamiliar with patient needs are determining what the patient receives. Sometimes such a patient will forgo the needed appointment because the insurance company refuses to pay for it.

Another example: you need a crown and the insurance determines they will only pay for an amalgam. This confuses you because you may think we are recommending unnecessary work. But the insurance examiner has never seen you, and yet they dictate your treatment. Please remember: the insurance companies are not interested in your dental health. They are only interested in charging you as much as possible, and paying out as little as possible. They profit most when they deny as many procedures as possible.

In contrast, our goal is to protect your teeth, and keep you out of dental trouble. 

Dental coverage may be a benefit provided by your employer and you do not have to pay the premiums yourself. Whatever your employer pays does help with the treatment fee. If you pay individually, evaluate how much it will cost you versus what they are willing to pay. Quite often the “benefit” is not worth the cost.

If you are an employer, proceed with caution. Providing dental insurance as a “benefit” may not be as valuable as other ways to aid employees. More dangerously, buying into this system does help to perpetuate it. There could be other benefits that are more helpful.

It is the responsibility of the insurance company to make coverage policies clear to patients. But it is in their economic interest misrepresent and keep vague. So to understand the benefits of your policy falls into your hands. And, unfortunately, we have only limited ability to help you understand policy. Rather, we can help you make the best choices for your health and circumstances.

Dental insurance should not determine getting the care you need. Such a decision belongs with you, supported by our care, skill, and judgment. —Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

Gum Health: an Early Warning System

The relationship between your bones, gums, and teeth is collaboration at its best. When all three work in harmony, life is good. Any challenge can be confronted and mastered, if you have your health. But when this harmony is disturbed, the structure of your lifestyle is undermined.
As you age, your gums and teeth will reflect both what happens to you, and how you react. Those who understand oral health will start with understanding the gums. Because without strong gums, healthy teeth will be the victims of instability.
Patients often wonder why we poke around so much. We take intricate measurements of your gums to evaluate. We hear often that we are more thorough than our patients have ever experienced! The threats to gum health are displayed by the most minute changes. The numbers that we call out during our routine evaluations sound mysterious, but are the early-warning signals that save potential pain, time, and expense. We wish to show you how to keep your teeth and gums at their best.
Periodontitis is a gum disease that affects the periodontium, or the tissues that surround your teeth. The bone and tissue should fit tightly. But if there is loss, or a diminishing of this bone and tissue, dangerous pockets can form that are difficult to clean. They allow bacteria to grow and increase the chance for infection. A pocket reduction will solve the immediate threat, and prevent any further deterioration.
The threat begins with the microorganisms and bacteria that grow on the surface of the tooth. The body fights against these organisms by the tissue receding, and next, the bone. Periodontitis is diagnosed by examining the gum tissue with a probe and by evaluating x-rays to see bone loss. Gingival sulcus is the space between a tooth and the surrounding tissue. In gum disease, this pocket is deepened. Sadly, this condition causes the greatest loss of teeth for adults.
Age and wear increases these pockets. So to best slow deterioration, to keep gums and bone as a great foundation for the teeth so cared for, visit us regularly:
1. Track the fit of your gums, and detect gingivitis before it turns into periodontitis. During a periodontal exam, we examine the depth of space between your tooth and gum, examine the color and texture of your gums, and also see how much plaque build-up is present.
2. Receive Periodontal charting during check-ups, which is the process of organizing your teeth and gum health. Ideal pocket depth is less than 4 mm, which means no risk for periodontal disease.
3. Know what is normal for you. Each person has a different skin tone and condition for health. Observe your own mouth to know quickly any variations.
4. Brush correctly. Some patients damage their gums by continually pushing upon them so they recede by wear. Let us show you the best techniques to keep the teeth clean without any repetitive threats that happen with the best intensions!
5. Floss regularly to keep the space between your teeth clean, and to exercise your gum tissue. Like a muscle, the right exercise strengthens, whereas the wrong, or careless activity, will weaken. A few simple maintenance techniques will make all the difference!
6. Obtain treatment early for any issues that do arise. Gums are like an early-warning system for problems that only escalate in seriousness, and do not go away. Though the body is an amazing healer, when it comes to gums, help is needed, especially the longer you live.

 

Everyone has gum concerns, especially as the years pass. If you are young, the habits that you form now will pay off greatly for an enjoyable future! If you are older, consider the condition of your gums as indicative of your journey. Taking care of this very special collaboration continues to be your health guide like a map to where you most wish to go.

Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/