Category Archives: Evanston dental

Transforming Dentistry

Dentistry is continually improved by innovative treatments. Dental lasers, one of the newest, have many applications from procedural preparations to surgery to even teeth whitening. Overall, they increase accuracy, speed procedures, and allow faster healing. Learn why patients and dentists both rave about this development.
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

A Holistic Approach

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Arnold-K-Chernoff-DDS/102509379824402?ref=hl

Easy Explanations that Inspire Dental Diligence

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

EIGHT SIMPLE STEPS TO DENTAL HEALTH

STEP 1: Understand your own oral health needs.
“Your oral health depends on many factors, including your diet [what you eat], the type and amount of saliva in your mouth, habits, your overall health and your oral hygiene routine,” Dr. Albert said. Changes in our overall health often create changes in our oral health. “For example, many medications, including more than 300 common drugs, can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, resulting in dry mouth,” he said. “They also can make your saliva ropy or thicker in consistency. Women who are pregnant experience oral changes. This often includes inflammation of the gums, which is called pregnancy gingivitis. Patients with asthma often breathe through their mouths, particularly when sleeping, which can result in dry mouth and increased plaque formation and gingivitis.”

STEP 2: Commit to a daily oral health routine.
Set a regular time to form good habits. Everyone is in a hurry, so habit-forming must be a conscious effort to establish. But once we have a momentum, committing to the confidence gained, for only around five minutes per day, the long-term results are dramatic.

STEP 3:  Eat a balanced diet.
Limit snacks, particularly those high in simple sugars. When we eat, particles of food lodged around teeth provide fuel for bacteria. The bacteria produces acid every time we eat. The more often we eat and the longer food stays in our mouths, the more time bacteria has to produce acids that begin the decay process. Repeated acid attacks break down the enamel surface of our teeth, which leads to cavities. If you must snack, brush your teeth, or chew sugarless gum afterward. A balanced diet is also important. Deficiencies in minerals and vitamins can also affect your oral health, as well as your general health.

STEP 4: Brush regularly with fluoride.
Everyone should brush at least twice a day, preferably three times, or after every meal. Include fluoride to strengthen developing teeth in children and to help prevent decay in adults and children. Toothpastes and mouthwashes are good sources of fluoride. Your dentist can prescribe stronger concentrations of fluoride through gels or rinses if you need it.

STEP 5: Floss at least twice a day to remove plaque, in addition to brushing.
Millions of bacteria live in our mouths and feed off of food left on our teeth. Food particles lodged between teeth and caught in the gums surrounding teeth can not be removed completely by brushing alone. As bacteria flourish, they produce an acid that eats into tooth enamel and a sulfur compound that creates bad breath. Left alone, bacteria grows in a sticky mesh of mucus and debris called “plaque.” This plaque not only fosters enamel decay and cavities, but also irritates the gums, causing periodontal diseases. Flossing breaks up the colonies of bacteria sticking to our teeth. Follow with a dental rinse as a good way to swish and spit bacteria away. Flossing helps keep our teeth clean, and breath fresh, between visits to our dental hygienists for “professional plaque removal.”

STEP 6: If you use tobacco, in any form, quit.
Smoking or using smokeless tobacco increases your risk of oral cancer, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth decay. Using tobacco also contributes to bad breath and stains on your teeth. If you smoke or use smokeless tobacco, your dentist or dental hygienist can show you where lesions are most likely to appear.

STEP 7: Examine your mouth regularly.
Even if we visit our dentists regularly, we are in the best positions to notice changes in our mouths. Your dentist sees you only a few times a year, but you can examine your mouth weekly to look for changes that might be of concern. These changes could include swollen gums, chipped teeth, discolored teeth, sores or lesions. A regular examination is particularly important for tobacco users, who are at increased risk of developing oral cancer.

STEP 8: Visit the dental office regularly.
You and your dentist should talk about the frequency of regular visits. We each need a different blend of oral and dental care, for no two people have mouths the same.

With these easy maintenance steps, regular checkups, and knowing what to watch for, we can ensure that our teeth remain strong as we age. It takes so little for such a beneficial long-term investment!

Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best. Visit our centrally located Evanston, Illinois, dental office with convenient hours to fit your schedule.

Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS

Office: 847-475-4080

website: www.chernoffdds.com

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Chernoffisms Launched

“Chernoffisms” are easy-to-remember sayings that support dental hygiene habits. I have collected these through the years, yet still come up with new ones. Having them illustrated will also help to make them memorable. Hopefully, you find these as motivational as I intend them! May you find your best care to optimum oral health! —Dr. Arnold Chernoff
 
 
Chernoffism #1 ——————————–
“To smile confidently and proudly is one of life’s greatest delights.”
Dental diligence is vastly rewarding. In the moments of first impressions, a confident smile can transform a good experience to a great one.
Chernoffism #2——————————–
“Bones, gums, and teeth work in harmony as a very special collaboration. It is one guide to your total health.”
Gums provide the best early warning system for when help is needed. Every mouth needs assistance to stay healthy, as this is often where we show stress or imbalance first. 
Chernoffism #3——————————–
“Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best.”
Every mouth is as unique as its owner. Every mouth needs help to keep at its best. Whatever can happen in wear and tear to our mouths as we live full lives, has a solution that can preserve full functionality.
Chernoffism #4——————————–
“By maintaining your teeth, you ensure they are always there when you need them.” 
Threats to oral longevity are insidious, and develop slowly, almost unnoticed. The only way to combat is through awareness and developing maintenance habits.
PLEASE SEE THE “CHERNOFFISMS” ON FACEBOOK!

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS

Office: 847-475-4080

 

Dental Diligence Defined

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

NEW FEATURE: Eight Steps to Dental Health

Of all the activities for ensuring health, dental diligence is the least time-consuming. Some people assume they will lose their teeth as they age, but that doesn’t have to happen. To keep our teeth for a lifetime only takes eight simple steps, from forming a daily routine, knowing what to watch for, and developing a relationship with your dentist for greatest efficiency.

EIGHT SIMPLE STEPS TO DENTAL HEALTH

STEP 1: Understand your own oral health needs.
“Your oral health depends on many factors, including your diet [what you eat], the type and amount of saliva in your mouth, habits, your overall health and your oral hygiene routine,” Dr. Albert said. Changes in our overall health often create changes in our oral health. “For example, many medications, including more than 300 common drugs, can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, resulting in dry mouth,” he said. “They also can make your saliva ropy or thicker in consistency. Women who are pregnant experience oral changes. This often includes inflammation of the gums, which is called pregnancy gingivitis. Patients with asthma often breathe through their mouths, particularly when sleeping, which can result in dry mouth and increased plaque formation and gingivitis.”

STEP 2: Commit to a daily oral health routine.
Set a regular time to form good habits. Everyone is in a hurry, so habit-forming must be a conscious effort to establish. But once we have a momentum, committing to the confidence gained, for only around five minutes per day, the long-term results are dramatic.

STEP 3:  Eat a balanced diet.
Limit snacks, particularly those high in simple sugars. When we eat, particles of food lodged around teeth provide fuel for bacteria. The bacteria produces acid every time we eat. The more often we eat and the longer food stays in our mouths, the more time bacteria has to produce acids that begin the decay process. Repeated acid attacks break down the enamel surface of our teeth, which leads to cavities. If you must snack, brush your teeth, or chew sugarless gum afterward. A balanced diet is also important. Deficiencies in minerals and vitamins can also affect your oral health, as well as your general health.

STEP 4: Brush regularly with fluoride.
Everyone should brush at least twice a day, preferably three times, or after every meal. Include fluoride to strengthen developing teeth in children and to help prevent decay in adults and children. Toothpastes and mouthwashes are good sources of fluoride. Your dentist can prescribe stronger concentrations of fluoride through gels or rinses if you need it.

STEP 5: Floss at least twice a day to remove plaque, in addition to brushing.
Millions of bacteria live in our mouths and feed off of food left on our teeth. Food particles lodged between teeth and caught in the gums surrounding teeth can not be removed completely by brushing alone. As bacteria flourish, they produce an acid that eats into tooth enamel and a sulfur compound that creates bad breath. Left alone, bacteria grows in a sticky mesh of mucus and debris called “plaque.” This plaque not only fosters enamel decay and cavities, but also irritates the gums, causing periodontal diseases. Flossing breaks up the colonies of bacteria sticking to our teeth. Follow with a dental rinse as a good way to swish and spit bacteria away. Flossing helps keep our teeth clean, and breath fresh, between visits to our dental hygienists for “professional plaque removal.”

STEP 6: If you use tobacco, in any form, quit.
Smoking or using smokeless tobacco increases your risk of oral cancer, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth decay. Using tobacco also contributes to bad breath and stains on your teeth. If you smoke or use smokeless tobacco, your dentist or dental hygienist can show you where lesions are most likely to appear.

STEP 7: Examine your mouth regularly.
Even if we visit our dentists regularly, we are in the best positions to notice changes in our mouths. Your dentist sees you only a few times a year, but you can examine your mouth weekly to look for changes that might be of concern. These changes could include swollen gums, chipped teeth, discolored teeth, sores or lesions. A regular examination is particularly important for tobacco users, who are at increased risk of developing oral cancer.

STEP 8: Visit the dental office regularly.
You and your dentist should talk about the frequency of regular visits. We each need a different blend of oral and dental care, for no two people have mouths the same.

With these easy maintenance steps, regular checkups, and knowing what to watch for, we can ensure that our teeth remain strong as we age. It takes so little for such a beneficial long-term investment!

Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best. Visit our centrally located Evanston, Illinois, dental office with convenient hours to fit your schedule.

Located conveniently, our comfortable Evanston dental office provides comprehensive care with personal attention and conscientiousness. We will help you discover the best options for your dental needs, and combine state-of-the-art treatments with a warm, family-oriented, environment. Dedicated to preventative oral health and restorative dental techniques, we help you with your dental diligence. It is your easiest way to overall health.
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

Understandable Dental Explanations

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.
To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

Dental Care: Implants

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.
To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

Dental Explanations You Can Understand

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.
To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.
Teeth as Best Friends
Until something happens, most of us take our teeth for granted. We may not always remember to brush and floss. We often procrastinate visits to the dentist. Teeth can be easy to ignore because problems don’t develop quickly. Rarely are there true emergencies. Like a best friend, they are always there to help our well being. Like a best friend, we depend on them when we need them. But, also like a best friend, they do need attention. They have needs as well. …
 
Cleaning Towards Total Health
Getting your teeth cleaned affects your health in unexpected ways. Though most people find it a mundane routine, research proves that your dental diligence is a measure of your total health. …
The Boost and Advantage of a Whiter Smile
Nothing impresses more than a dazzling smile. Many choose to whiten teeth for special occasions like weddings or job seeking. Others have jobs dealing with the public where first impressions are critical. White teeth says conscientious, healthy, prosperous—qualities people want around them—qualities we wish not only to project, but to live. …
Gum Health: An Early Warning System
The relationship between your bones, gums, and teeth is collaboration at its best. When all three work in harmony, life is good. But when this harmony is disturbed, the structure of your lifestyle is undermined. Gums are like an early-warning system for problems that only escalate in seriousness, and do not go away. Though the body is an amazing healer, when it comes to gums, help is needed. …
The Hidden Risks of Sleep Apnea 
You might be surprised to learn SA affects more than just your sleep. If you have SA, or believe you might, get informed and get treated. Not just because you’ll experience better insurance rates, but you’ll likely live longer, too. …

The Deception of Dental Insurance

About once a day, a patient declares: “I can’t get my teeth fixed because I don’t have dental insurance.” Many patients do not understand how dental insurance works. It is not fair to blame the patients for being confused about what benefits are offered. The general information that the insurance companies provide is vague and there is much it does not explain. Though it would be impossible to convey every coverage detail here, so-called dental insurance is not what most expect.

In the mid-70’s, when dental insurance was just coming onto the scene, the benefits were about $1000-$1500. Of course, the premiums that were paid to insurance companies have steadily increased over the last 35 years. Additionally, today $1000 does not buy nearly the same amount of dentistry that it bought in 1975. Back then, a crown fee was $222. Now it is about $1200. The coverage has not kept pace.

The purpose of any insurance is to protect you from catastrophic loss. You buy home insurance in case your house burns down. You buy medical insurance in case you have to be hospitalized. Do you need insurance to pay a $1500 dental bill? The insurance generally only covers 50-80%. This so-called insurance is of more benefit to the insurance company than it is to you!

Most seriously, this kind of insurance distorts your perception of dentist’s recommendation. It complicates your treatment plan because there is now a third party advising you on what dental care you can receive. 

Consider a common situation: a patient needs to be re-evaluated for periodontal disease in three months, but the insurance company will only pay if seen in six months. The adjusters have pre-set rules for every condition, regardless of personal situation. But no two patients have the same conditions! Nonetheless, those unfamiliar with patient needs are determining what the patient receives. Sometimes such a patient will forgo the needed appointment because the insurance company refuses to pay for it.

Another example: you need a crown and the insurance determines they will only pay for an amalgam. This confuses you because you may think we are recommending unnecessary work. But the insurance examiner has never seen you, and yet they dictate your treatment. Please remember: the insurance companies are not interested in your dental health. They are only interested in charging you as much as possible, and paying out as little as possible. They profit most when they deny as many procedures as possible.

In contrast, our goal is to protect your teeth, and keep you out of dental trouble. 

Dental coverage may be a benefit provided by your employer and you do not have to pay the premiums yourself. Whatever your employer pays does help with the treatment fee. If you pay individually, evaluate how much it will cost you versus what they are willing to pay. Quite often the “benefit” is not worth the cost.

If you are an employer, proceed with caution. Providing dental insurance as a “benefit” may not be as valuable as other ways to aid employees. More dangerously, buying into this system does help to perpetuate it. There could be other benefits that are more helpful.

It is the responsibility of the insurance company to make coverage policies clear to patients. But it is in their economic interest misrepresent and keep vague. So to understand the benefits of your policy falls into your hands. And, unfortunately, we have only limited ability to help you understand policy. Rather, we can help you make the best choices for your health and circumstances.

Dental insurance should not determine getting the care you need. Such a decision belongs with you, supported by our care, skill, and judgment. —Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

An Exciting Procedure

Last week, we had an exciting case. We had a patient who requested me to remove all of his upper teeth and wanted an immediate upper denture. This patient wanted to avoid a removable denture at all costs. So, we decided upon teeth in a day technique.

This took quite a bit of planning but the outcome was phenomenal. We took out all the upper teeth at one time and placed 6 implants. We inserted a temporary bridge the same day.

The patient walked out with a fixed temporary bridge and never had to wear a removable appliance. By the way, the patient was over the age of 80!

A few years ago, I would not have thought this was possible. It’s amazing the changes that are occurring in dentistry! We are proud to be a part of it. We will post some pictures soon.