Category Archives: dental health

Your Dental Care Decision

Health combines circumstances with choices. This series of articles are to share information that help you choose the best dental options for your situation. Our mission is to enhance the appearance, comfort, and function of your teeth. You direct the process as we help you achieve a higher level of self-esteem, quality of life, and well-being.

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

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Oral Cancer Awareness Month

The American Dental Association is sponsoring Oral Cancer Awareness Month in April—encouraging all dentists to increase the low percentage of patients that receive oral cancer screening. A brief guide to symptoms and the easy examination are featured this month:

 

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

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A Holistic Approach

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Arnold-K-Chernoff-DDS/102509379824402?ref=hl

To Inspire Dental Diligence

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

NEW FEATURE: What is the Value of One Tooth?

Unfortunate events give perspective to what has the most value. Scott Smith explains his realizations gained from hard experience.

“Comparisons give instant perspective. Coming home with bad news, I dragged my feet into the house, only to discover my wife sitting in the kitchen with a face sadder than mine! She cried, ‘This morning I lost my diamond ring!’ And she preceded to describe the sequence of events.
Once she calmed, I could then declare my own misfortune: ‘I cracked a tooth and it split to its base. I ran to Dr. Chernoff’s Evanston office, where he eased my pain, but gave me some bad news.’ Her tears dried up instantly when I told her that I lost the tooth.
Suddenly, our discussion shifted to value—which is the greater loss? Without hesitation, I concluded, ‘My loss is much bigger than yours. Dr. C explained to me all the ramifications of one lost tooth: my alignment will shift making my bite off, causing uneven chewing, receding gums, loss of bone, aging my face faster, and ultimately will affect my self image. A tooth is far more valuable than a diamond!’” —Scott Smith, Evanston, IL
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

Easy Explanations that Inspire Dental Diligence

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

EIGHT SIMPLE STEPS TO DENTAL HEALTH

STEP 1: Understand your own oral health needs.
“Your oral health depends on many factors, including your diet [what you eat], the type and amount of saliva in your mouth, habits, your overall health and your oral hygiene routine,” Dr. Albert said. Changes in our overall health often create changes in our oral health. “For example, many medications, including more than 300 common drugs, can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, resulting in dry mouth,” he said. “They also can make your saliva ropy or thicker in consistency. Women who are pregnant experience oral changes. This often includes inflammation of the gums, which is called pregnancy gingivitis. Patients with asthma often breathe through their mouths, particularly when sleeping, which can result in dry mouth and increased plaque formation and gingivitis.”

STEP 2: Commit to a daily oral health routine.
Set a regular time to form good habits. Everyone is in a hurry, so habit-forming must be a conscious effort to establish. But once we have a momentum, committing to the confidence gained, for only around five minutes per day, the long-term results are dramatic.

STEP 3:  Eat a balanced diet.
Limit snacks, particularly those high in simple sugars. When we eat, particles of food lodged around teeth provide fuel for bacteria. The bacteria produces acid every time we eat. The more often we eat and the longer food stays in our mouths, the more time bacteria has to produce acids that begin the decay process. Repeated acid attacks break down the enamel surface of our teeth, which leads to cavities. If you must snack, brush your teeth, or chew sugarless gum afterward. A balanced diet is also important. Deficiencies in minerals and vitamins can also affect your oral health, as well as your general health.

STEP 4: Brush regularly with fluoride.
Everyone should brush at least twice a day, preferably three times, or after every meal. Include fluoride to strengthen developing teeth in children and to help prevent decay in adults and children. Toothpastes and mouthwashes are good sources of fluoride. Your dentist can prescribe stronger concentrations of fluoride through gels or rinses if you need it.

STEP 5: Floss at least twice a day to remove plaque, in addition to brushing.
Millions of bacteria live in our mouths and feed off of food left on our teeth. Food particles lodged between teeth and caught in the gums surrounding teeth can not be removed completely by brushing alone. As bacteria flourish, they produce an acid that eats into tooth enamel and a sulfur compound that creates bad breath. Left alone, bacteria grows in a sticky mesh of mucus and debris called “plaque.” This plaque not only fosters enamel decay and cavities, but also irritates the gums, causing periodontal diseases. Flossing breaks up the colonies of bacteria sticking to our teeth. Follow with a dental rinse as a good way to swish and spit bacteria away. Flossing helps keep our teeth clean, and breath fresh, between visits to our dental hygienists for “professional plaque removal.”

STEP 6: If you use tobacco, in any form, quit.
Smoking or using smokeless tobacco increases your risk of oral cancer, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth decay. Using tobacco also contributes to bad breath and stains on your teeth. If you smoke or use smokeless tobacco, your dentist or dental hygienist can show you where lesions are most likely to appear.

STEP 7: Examine your mouth regularly.
Even if we visit our dentists regularly, we are in the best positions to notice changes in our mouths. Your dentist sees you only a few times a year, but you can examine your mouth weekly to look for changes that might be of concern. These changes could include swollen gums, chipped teeth, discolored teeth, sores or lesions. A regular examination is particularly important for tobacco users, who are at increased risk of developing oral cancer.

STEP 8: Visit the dental office regularly.
You and your dentist should talk about the frequency of regular visits. We each need a different blend of oral and dental care, for no two people have mouths the same.

With these easy maintenance steps, regular checkups, and knowing what to watch for, we can ensure that our teeth remain strong as we age. It takes so little for such a beneficial long-term investment!

Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best. Visit our centrally located Evanston, Illinois, dental office with convenient hours to fit your schedule.

Arnold K. Chernoff, DDS, http://www.chernoffdds.com/

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS

Office: 847-475-4080

website: www.chernoffdds.com

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Chernoffisms Launched

“Chernoffisms” are easy-to-remember sayings that support dental hygiene habits. I have collected these through the years, yet still come up with new ones. Having them illustrated will also help to make them memorable. Hopefully, you find these as motivational as I intend them! May you find your best care to optimum oral health! —Dr. Arnold Chernoff
 
 
Chernoffism #1 ——————————–
“To smile confidently and proudly is one of life’s greatest delights.”
Dental diligence is vastly rewarding. In the moments of first impressions, a confident smile can transform a good experience to a great one.
Chernoffism #2——————————–
“Bones, gums, and teeth work in harmony as a very special collaboration. It is one guide to your total health.”
Gums provide the best early warning system for when help is needed. Every mouth needs assistance to stay healthy, as this is often where we show stress or imbalance first. 
Chernoffism #3——————————–
“Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best.”
Every mouth is as unique as its owner. Every mouth needs help to keep at its best. Whatever can happen in wear and tear to our mouths as we live full lives, has a solution that can preserve full functionality.
Chernoffism #4——————————–
“By maintaining your teeth, you ensure they are always there when you need them.” 
Threats to oral longevity are insidious, and develop slowly, almost unnoticed. The only way to combat is through awareness and developing maintenance habits.
PLEASE SEE THE “CHERNOFFISMS” ON FACEBOOK!

Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS

Office: 847-475-4080

 

Dental Diligence Defined

Being healthy in today’s society is time consuming and expensive without shortcuts. Diet, exercise, and healthcare all demand attention. One of the fastest and easiest ways to maintain overall health can start with oral health.

To help you with the basic knowledge needed to keep your oral health at its best, we publish a series of helpful tips in short articles. These give you a simple guide to reveal options, save time, money, and effort. They help you easily do your dental diligence and we hope you find them helpful.

NEW FEATURE: Eight Steps to Dental Health

Of all the activities for ensuring health, dental diligence is the least time-consuming. Some people assume they will lose their teeth as they age, but that doesn’t have to happen. To keep our teeth for a lifetime only takes eight simple steps, from forming a daily routine, knowing what to watch for, and developing a relationship with your dentist for greatest efficiency.

EIGHT SIMPLE STEPS TO DENTAL HEALTH

STEP 1: Understand your own oral health needs.
“Your oral health depends on many factors, including your diet [what you eat], the type and amount of saliva in your mouth, habits, your overall health and your oral hygiene routine,” Dr. Albert said. Changes in our overall health often create changes in our oral health. “For example, many medications, including more than 300 common drugs, can reduce the amount of saliva in your mouth, resulting in dry mouth,” he said. “They also can make your saliva ropy or thicker in consistency. Women who are pregnant experience oral changes. This often includes inflammation of the gums, which is called pregnancy gingivitis. Patients with asthma often breathe through their mouths, particularly when sleeping, which can result in dry mouth and increased plaque formation and gingivitis.”

STEP 2: Commit to a daily oral health routine.
Set a regular time to form good habits. Everyone is in a hurry, so habit-forming must be a conscious effort to establish. But once we have a momentum, committing to the confidence gained, for only around five minutes per day, the long-term results are dramatic.

STEP 3:  Eat a balanced diet.
Limit snacks, particularly those high in simple sugars. When we eat, particles of food lodged around teeth provide fuel for bacteria. The bacteria produces acid every time we eat. The more often we eat and the longer food stays in our mouths, the more time bacteria has to produce acids that begin the decay process. Repeated acid attacks break down the enamel surface of our teeth, which leads to cavities. If you must snack, brush your teeth, or chew sugarless gum afterward. A balanced diet is also important. Deficiencies in minerals and vitamins can also affect your oral health, as well as your general health.

STEP 4: Brush regularly with fluoride.
Everyone should brush at least twice a day, preferably three times, or after every meal. Include fluoride to strengthen developing teeth in children and to help prevent decay in adults and children. Toothpastes and mouthwashes are good sources of fluoride. Your dentist can prescribe stronger concentrations of fluoride through gels or rinses if you need it.

STEP 5: Floss at least twice a day to remove plaque, in addition to brushing.
Millions of bacteria live in our mouths and feed off of food left on our teeth. Food particles lodged between teeth and caught in the gums surrounding teeth can not be removed completely by brushing alone. As bacteria flourish, they produce an acid that eats into tooth enamel and a sulfur compound that creates bad breath. Left alone, bacteria grows in a sticky mesh of mucus and debris called “plaque.” This plaque not only fosters enamel decay and cavities, but also irritates the gums, causing periodontal diseases. Flossing breaks up the colonies of bacteria sticking to our teeth. Follow with a dental rinse as a good way to swish and spit bacteria away. Flossing helps keep our teeth clean, and breath fresh, between visits to our dental hygienists for “professional plaque removal.”

STEP 6: If you use tobacco, in any form, quit.
Smoking or using smokeless tobacco increases your risk of oral cancer, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth decay. Using tobacco also contributes to bad breath and stains on your teeth. If you smoke or use smokeless tobacco, your dentist or dental hygienist can show you where lesions are most likely to appear.

STEP 7: Examine your mouth regularly.
Even if we visit our dentists regularly, we are in the best positions to notice changes in our mouths. Your dentist sees you only a few times a year, but you can examine your mouth weekly to look for changes that might be of concern. These changes could include swollen gums, chipped teeth, discolored teeth, sores or lesions. A regular examination is particularly important for tobacco users, who are at increased risk of developing oral cancer.

STEP 8: Visit the dental office regularly.
You and your dentist should talk about the frequency of regular visits. We each need a different blend of oral and dental care, for no two people have mouths the same.

With these easy maintenance steps, regular checkups, and knowing what to watch for, we can ensure that our teeth remain strong as we age. It takes so little for such a beneficial long-term investment!

Take care of your oral health to keep your whole body at its best. Visit our centrally located Evanston, Illinois, dental office with convenient hours to fit your schedule.

Located conveniently, our comfortable Evanston dental office provides comprehensive care with personal attention and conscientiousness. We will help you discover the best options for your dental needs, and combine state-of-the-art treatments with a warm, family-oriented, environment. Dedicated to preventative oral health and restorative dental techniques, we help you with your dental diligence. It is your easiest way to overall health.
Dr. Arnold K. Chernoff DDS
Office: 847-475-4080

 

The Past, Present, and Future of Dental Technology

Toothbrushes & Toothpaste
Dental Technologies have come a long way, resulting in better, more efficient oral healthcare for patients. Here is a brief history of dental technology, followed by the newest advancements in dentistry today.
While early populations used small sticks or twigs to clean teeth, the Europeans adapted the bristle brush by the 17th century. The electric toothbrush was introduced to the USA in 1960.
Early recipes of toothpaste included powdered fruit, talc, and dried flowers. Many concoctions, unfortunately, dissolved tooth enamel. The toothpaste that we are familiar with today made it’s first appearance in the 1800s and was made with soap and chalk. By 1956, Crest toothpaste with fluoride was first introduced. Today, toothpaste is composed of water, abrasives, fluoride, and detergents.

Fluoridated Drinking Water
Introducing fluoride into the water supply can help fight tooth decay. Testing has shown that fluoride reduces the incidence of cavities by approximately two-thirds. In 1951, the United States Public Health Service urged the country to fluoridate public drinking water. The ideal ratio for reducing decay without damaging teeth is one part fluoride per one million parts water. Today, more than 60% of Americans have access to fluoridated drinking water.

The Roaring 19th Century
In 1840, Horace Hayden and Chapin Harris invented modern dentistry by founding the first dental school: the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. They awarded the DDS degree and created the first professional dental society.

Current Issues in Dentistry
As we look to improve the status of oral health care in the US, it is important to continuously integrate dentistry into the concept of comprehensive, total-body health care. Researchers are investigating the notion of growing new teeth and used computer-assisted technology for diagnosis and treatments. We must promote health on a community level!

Advancements in Dental Technology
CAD/CAM: Computer Assisted Design/Computer Assisted Manufacture: This technology allows for the design of dental restorations that resemble natural teeth. It is commonly used for bridges, inlays/onlays, veneers, and crowns. First, an image called a dental impression, is taken and an image is projected with a computer. Software is able to create a virtual restoration that will ultimately be used to improve your smile.

Air-AbrasionAir-abrasion is a great dental advancement over the dental drill as it allows precise removal of decayed teeth without the use of a local anesthetic. The air-abrasion system uses blasts of pellets of air and aluminum oxide to treat tooth problems such as cavities.


Digital X-Rays: these types of x-rays are faster, easy to store, and safer than radiographs. They use 75% less radiation, and can easily be emailed to other specialists for collaboration. They are better for the environment and are a major improvement in the field of dental imaging. Today, we even have the technology for digital dentures. 

Curing lights are also used quite extensively in modern dental practices to cure composites. Resin-based composites are able to harden with exposure to a high-intensity light source. In addition, the rise of electronic dental records have made record-keeping very easy and organized, and allows the transmission of information between doctors. 

Overall, the field of dentistry continues to expand and advance in outstanding ways. The future of oral healthcare appears bright, just like our patients’ smiles!  

To wear an athletic guard, or not to wear an athletic guard? That is the question.

This week, we just finished a case that illustrates visually why it is so important to use a mouth guard when engaging in sporting activities.This young man was skateboarding when he lost his balance and fell flat on his face. The fall caused damage to many of his teeth, and four ultimately had to be removed. The photo below was taken about a week subsequent to to the accident after the four extractions.

We had to place a crown in addition to replacing the missing teeth with dental implants. I am very pleased with the final result below, but the treatment took over a year to complete and was quite expensive for the patient. The final figure was about what one might expect to pay for a small car.

In case you were wondering, we left some of the metal substructure of the crown exposed in order to give it more strength. This tooth is not is a cosmetic area, meaning that it will not show in the patient’s smile.

It is much better to protect the smile that nature provides you than to rebuild it artificially. Remember that the best dentist in the world is G-d. Let’s do all that we can to protect his handiwork so that you can avoid mine.